Download Cambridge The Transvestite Achilles by P. J. Heslin PDF

By P. J. Heslin

As we persist with Achilles' metamorphosis from wild boy to demure lady to lover to hero, Statius brilliantly illustrates a chain of contrasting codes of habit: female and male, epic and elegiac. this primary full-length learn of the poem addresses not just the narrative itself, but additionally units the parable of Achilles on Scyros inside of a extensive interpretive framework. The exploration levels from the reception of the Achilleid in Baroque opera to the anthropological parallels that experience emerged to give an explanation for Achilles' transvestism.

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Lycomedes points to Deidamia’s vow of chastity and offers him Cyrene instead, at which Deidamia’s jealousy flares up again, and she denounces Achilles. Ulysses engineers a reconciliation between the lovers, but as they prepare to depart, Lycomedes surprises the group. Ulysses stops Achilles as he is about to identify himself, and instead tells Lycomedes that Achilles is really Pyrrha, crossdressed as a man. When Polycastes, who is not a party to this latest deception, assaults Achilles for being the kidnapper of his beloved Pyrrha, he is disarmed; and he is humiliated when the identity of Pyrrha as a man is finally revealed to him.

When Polycastes, who is not a party to this latest deception, assaults Achilles for being the kidnapper of his beloved Pyrrha, he is disarmed; and he is humiliated when the identity of Pyrrha as a man is finally revealed to him. Polycastes and Cyrene are reconciled, and in the final scene Ulysses explains the truth to Lycomedes, who accepts Achilles as his son-in-law. The plot is endless and unsatisfying; the first act is mainly concerned with the Polycastes and Cyrene sub-plot, which then all but disappears from the stage.

Op en i n g n ig h t s at t h e op era 1 64 1 – 1 74 4 11 Bentivoglio blurs the distinction between passionate female friendship and romantic love by having Deidamia call her lover by the female name Pyrrha even when they are alone (Act 1, Scene 12). When the furious Deidamia attempts to reveal her relationship with Achilles to her father, Achilles explains that her outburst was merely the result of her concern that her excessive attachment to “Pyrrha” may have been detrimental to her vows of chastity (Act 2, Scene 14).

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